Request an Appointment

Oakland Spine News

Weekly Health Update — Chronic Disease Increases Musculoskeletal Pain Risk!

Chiropractic: Chronic Disease Increases Musculoskeletal Pain Risk!
An analysis of musculoskeletal injuries among police officers in South Korea found that officers who suffer from one or more chronic diseases (diabetes, for example) are 1.78 times more likely to experience musculoskeletal pain in the shoulder, neck, waist, hands/wrists/fingers, arms, and legs.
Journal of Physical Therapy Science, June 2014

Mental Attitude: Differences in Brains of People with Dyslexia.
Dyslexia causes problems with reading and writing and is the most commonly diagnosed learning disorder in the United States. Researchers have discovered that people with this condition have disrupted network connections in their brains. Using functional MRI, the research team found that individuals with dyslexia have less connectivity between a number of the brain regions used during the reading process when compared to MRI scans of people without dyslexia. Study author Dr. Emily Finn writes, “Compared to typical readers, dyslexics had weaker connections between areas that process visual information and areas that control attention, suggesting that individuals with dyslexia are less able to focus on printed words.”
Biological Psychiatry, August 2014

Health Alert: Kidney Stones Increase Risk of Heart Disease.
A new study suggests that kidney stones can increase an individual’s risk for coronary heart disease and stroke. The results of the study found that patients with kidney stones have a 19% increased risk for coronary heart disease and a 40% higher risk for stroke. Thomas Manley, director of scientific activities at the National Kidney Foundation, writes, “Kidney stones are common, and with their association to coronary heart disease and stroke found in this study, it suggests that a thorough cardiovascular assessment should be considered in patients who develop kidney stones.”
American Journal of Kidney Diseases, August 2014

Diet: Avoid Eating When You’re Not Hungry.
If you want to avoid eating when you’re not hungry, it is important to avoid common triggers that can lead to consuming extra calories and packing on pounds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that common triggers include seeing favorite snacks in the pantry, watching TV, close proximity to a vending machine, stressful situations, and being bored. The CDC recommends developing strategies for avoiding such triggers or finding healthier options if such situations are unavoidable.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, September 2011

Exercise: Daily Moderate Exercise Reduces Disability Risk in Seniors.
Daily moderate exercise can mean the difference between becoming housebound or keeping up with everyday activities later in life. Researchers found that daily moderate exercise among participants ages 70 to 89 reduced loss of mobility by 28% and increased walking ability by 18%. The exercise involved walking 150 minutes a week as well as strength, flexibility, and balance training. Co-principal investigator Dr. Jack Guralnik adds, “The very purpose of the study is to provide definitive evidence that physical activity can truly improve the independence of older adults.”
Journal of the American Medical Association, May 2014

Wellness/Prevention: Best Time for Sun Exposure.
Sun exposure is important for vitamin D synthesis, but too much sun can increase an individual’s risk for skin cancer. In a newly published study, a research team from Oslo University Hospital recommends the best times for optimal vitamin D production with minimal risk of skin cancer development are between 10:00 AM and 1:00 PM. Lead author Dr. Johan Moan adds that the common recommendations to avoid the sun altogether between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM may be wrong.
Advanced in Experimental Medicine and Biology, August 2014