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How A Sneeze Can Lead To Back Pain

Back Pain

Is Back Pain Really Nothing to Sneeze at?

The idea that a sneeze can actually injure your back is not as farfetched as it may seem. It’s a fact that sneezes trigger back pain misery and, in some case, may be the first step in the painful journey wrought by the inclusive condition we call a “bad back.”

It is difficult indeed to acknowledge that a sneeze could have this kind of impact on your spinal health.

After all, you may have lived an active life up to this point, doing all kinds of things that may not be good for your back— playing football and enduring and initiating tackles and blocks, as well physical labor requiring lifting heavy objects, often incorrectly, and all kinds of pushing, pulling and straining.

It is almost laughable, therefore, that after taking such risks over all those years, something like a sneeze could embark you on a voyage through back pain misery, including slipped or herniated discs, upper and lower back spasms that may, in themselves, lead to back injury, as well as, in extreme cases, paralysis of the limbs. It is quite probable that because of the aforementioned activities a disc may be on the precipice of herniation, or protruding from the spine, which means that at least one part of the spine may be vulnerable to any jolt or spasm. Stress, pressure and the jarring impact of a violent sneeze can indeed cause harm, especially if you are not in a stable position.

Sneeze“If you already suffer from musculoskeletal issues, sneezing can make matters worse for you,” reports the Accident and Injury Center, which suggests bracing yourself for stabilization and maintaining the natural arch of your back.

Consider that most of us who suddenly sneeze with people nearby, politely turn away just before the sneeze. This results in turning the head and twisting the spine as it is jolted by this convulsive expulsion.

If you experience sudden sharp pain down the spine after a forceful sneeze, you might want to check it out with your chiropractor or family doctor, who may refer you to a specialist if disease is already present.

Analyzing a sneeze indicates that it does indeed have potential for injury, and the spine— especially one already compromised by injury or deterioration— takes on the brunt of the impact. It’s like launching a missile. You arm the launch by holding your breath and therefore tightening the chest muscles, increasing the air and pressure in your lungs.

The result of a so-called violent sneeze is high-pressured expulsion of mostly air and droplets of mucous leaving the body. The velocity is nowhere near 100 miles an hour as recent laboratory testing has disproved.

It just feels like it at times.

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 for an appointment at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy…