Request an Appointment

NJ Pain Management

Sitting and Slouching Our Way to Back Pain

Sacroiliac Joint

The Back Pain Epidemic

Eighty percent of Americans will suffer from back pain in their lifetime, but what we are observing here at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy is that people are experiencing this all-too common aggravation at younger ages. It’s an ordeal that may lead to lack of mobility and disability at an age when you should be enjoying life at its fullest.

“Cases that we are used to seeing in people in their thirties and forties, we are seeing in teenagers,” reports Dr. Brad Butler, Chief of Staff at the Oakland Spine & Rehabilitation Centers in Oakland and Wayne, NJ. “Cases that we are used to seeing in sixty year olds, we are seeing in thirty and forty year olds.”

Why are we experiencing what might be described as an epidemic of back pain at a time when our challenges are supposedly being eased by technology. Our ancestors, after all, labored long hours every day in agrarian pursuits or working at industrial jobs. Their more physically demanding lives started at an earlier age, as adolescents and even young children, and chronic back injury would seem virtually inevitable.

There even seems to be a marked increase in back pain since the 1970’s and 1980’s when early technology were easing the load on farms and in factories and an increasing number were earning their pay as white-collar employees.

LaptopThe reason back pain is worse than ever, affecting people younger than ever, is that the world in which we live and work today is so different from the decades before computers, cell phones, and various technologies constantly available to us.

We spend an inordinate amount of our time squinting at laptop screens and scrolling through our cell phones. We’re sitting more and moving less, consuming hours every day huddling over digital devices with stress and strain moving down the body and into the neck and back.

Poor posture can exert extraordinary stress on your spine and even change its shape over time, impacting blood vessels and nerves. From there the stress can move to joints, muscles and the discs. Unchecked it will inevitable lead to back pain.

So if the effects of poor posture will inevitably lead to back pain and decreased mobility, is it possible that correcting your posture before it’s too late reverse the deterioration and save you from years of back pain?

The good news is yes. If there is no relief in sight, mobility will continue to worsen. That relief is up to you, and we’re here to help at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy.

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 for an appointment at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy…

 

Exercises for Hip Pain

Exercises for Hip Pain

There are two types of muscles that help facilitate motion in our hips and lower extremities: tonic and phasic.

Tonic (postural) muscles are always working or contracting to keep us upright. Therefore, these muscles tend to be tight and short. When we sleep, they contract or shorten and are taut upon waking and need to be stretched on a regular basis. Examples of tonic muscles include the hamstrings and the iliopsoas or hip flexors muscles. Here are two great stretches for these muscles:

Read More

Management Strategies for Chronic Low Back Pain

Chronic Low Back Pain (cLBP) is a BIG problem in our society, accounting for about 33% of work-related disability. So, what is the best management strategy for cLBP?

One study looked at the effectiveness of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) using three groups of patients with Chronic Low Back Pain. Each group received either: 1) “sham” spinal manipulation (twelve treatments of sham or “fake” SMT) over a one-month timeframe and then discontinued; 2) “real” SMT (high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust) twelve times during a one-month timeframe and then discontinued; and 3) the SAME as the second group but with additional SMT treatments every other week for nine additional months.

Read More

Chronic Whiplash Injuries and Pain Thresholds

Researchers have observed a phenomenon called “central sensitization” (CS) that is common in patients who have long-term, chronic pain following trauma such as whiplash. With CS, the patient’s ability to feel pain is abnormally high or hypersensitive, so when pain from pressure, temperature, electrical, or other sources is applied to the skin, they feel it sooner and more intensely than individuals without CS.

Read More

Women with Back Pain… The Silent Majority? Part 1

Women with Back Pain

Because humans are bipeds—that is, two-legged animals—our spines tend to experience greater loads than those our four-legged friends. This leads to men and women experiencing degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis much earlier in life compared with lions, tigers, and bears (and your dog or cat). Also, the majority of us (about 90%) have one leg that’s shorter than the other (average 5.2mm or ¼ inch), which can tilt the pelvis downward on the side with the shorter leg, which increases the risk for both back pain and neck pain. Fortunately, this can be rectified with a heel lift in the shoe. However, women also face unique anatomical, physiological, and social challenges when it comes to back pain…

Read More

Exercises on a Swiss Ball Help Back Pain Patients!

In previous articles, we’ve explored how to individualize an exercise program for those with back pain. This month, we’ll look at why utilizing a Swiss ball may be more helpful for the back pain patient than simply doing floor-based exercises.

In a 2015 study published in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, researchers assigned twelve chronic (more than three months) low back pain (cLBP) patients to perform either floor- or ball-based exercises three times a week for eight weeks using four different motions or exercises.

Read More

Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Stress and Well-Being Linked to Spinal Pain

Stress and Well-Being Linked to Spinal Pain

Danish researchers recently surveyed 45,371 ten- to fourteen-year-old children and found that spinal pain is a common complaint among this group, often co-occurring with stress and poor general well- being. The research team posits that addressing stress and well-being among teenagers could lower their overall risk for both back and neck pain during adolescence and possibly into adulthood. European Journal of Pediatrics, May 2017

Read More

Have You Tried This for Your Back Pain?

NJ Low Back Pain Treatment -Bergen/Passaic County

It’s not uncommon for low back pain patients to reduce their activities in an effort to avoid their pain. Unfortunately, it’s likely their core muscles—the muscles that help support their midsection—will become deconditioned over time due to inactivity, which may only increase the risk of further injury. Therefore, to effectively improve one’s low back pain status, he or she must first strengthen and keep their core muscles strong! Think in terms of one to three sets of ten reps for ease of application and ALWAYS release the exercise SLOWLY—don’t just drop back from the end-range of the exercise.

Read More