Request an Appointment

NJ Nutrition

Avoiding Hazards of Holiday Excess-Holidays and Nutrition

Only a third of men eat five or more servings of fruits and veggies each day

The holidays, as enjoyable as they may be for family gatherings and just plain vegging out from a busy work schedule, can take their toll on your health. This is the time of year when you are most likely to abandon a faithful exercise schedule and a healthy dietary regimen. The plan is that you’ll get right back in the saddle again, and, after all, Thanksgiving and Christmas are not the time for self-denial.

Psychologists tell us that people who are not overweight may gain a pound or two over the holidays. After all, it takes 3.500 extra calories to gain a pound. Five pounds translate into 18,500 extra calories. The average man requires in the neighborhood of 2,500 calories a day just to maintain healthy bodily functions, which should mean zero weight gain. This does not figure in metabolism and activity levels but is a vivid illustration of how even short-term overeating affects weight gain.

Now when you consider that you have to cut that daily calorie intake to 2,000 calories to lose a pound a week, it indicates how hard it is to get back on track. As far as compensating by initiating a daily exercise routine, consider that you burn only 100 calories by either walking or running a mile.

People who are already significantly overweight or obese are more likely to pack on five or more pounds during this celebratory span each year and barely 150 calories over an hour of running or walking.

Massive Calorie Intake During Holidays

Post-holiday from Thanksgiving until the start of the new year is when we often assess the massive amounts of calories we have consumed— much of it off the beaten path from our usual try-to-eat healthy lifestyle. January and February is when we are most likely to get serious about healthy living, including serious exercise and dieting.

To make up for our eating excesses, we too often set unrealistic goals in returning to a healthy lifestyle, relapsing to some of our unhealthy ways. You need an expert in preventative health, which simply means preventing ill health and injury through healthy practices and habits.

At Oakland Spine & Therapy we believe that nutrition and what you eat are directly connected to your health, critical to maintaining the musculoskeletal system. That means it is important in building and rebuilding the tissue that carries nervous system impulses.

Chiropractic care is all about preventative approaches, and that includes nutrition as a tool, reports Dr. Brad Butler, Chief of Staff at Oakland Spine & Therapy: “Medicine is the best at treating the symptoms of disease after it’s already present,” he says. . “By contrast, preventative healthcare, of which we are a part, looks to prevent disease before it happens.”

Nutrition is a big part of that, and sometimes you just need a nutrition-savvy preventative health practitioner on your side.

 

Treatment Option Comparison for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Treatment Option Comparison for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) results from the compression of the median nerve as it travels through the wrist. Classic symptoms associated with CTS include numbness, tingling, and weakness in the thumb, index, middle, and ring finger. In non-emergency situations, treatment guidelines recommend patients undergo conservative care before considering more invasive procedures, like surgery. This month’s article will look at the differences between standard medical care vs. chiropractic care to treat CTS.

Read More

What Causes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a condition that arises when the median nerve becomes compressed as it travels through the bony tunnel made up of the eight small carpal bones of the wrist. Its symptoms include pain, numbness, and tingling in the thumb, index, middle, and thumb-side half of the ring finger. If the pressure is great enough, weakness in grip and pinch strength can occur as well.

Read More

Neck Pain Management Strategies

Neck Pain

Because the human head weighs between 12-15 pounds (5.44-6.80 kg), the neck and upper back muscles must constantly work to maintain an upright posture. Due to our use of computer and electronic devices, many people have forward head posture (FHP), meaning their head rests forwards on the neck more than it should. In fact, studies show that every inch of FHP places an additional 10 pound (4.53 kg) burden on the muscles in the upper back and neck to keep the head upright. It’s no wonder why a common complaint is, “My head feels so heavy and my neck feels compressed—I constantly have to rest my head on the back of the couch when I sit.” So, what can we do about this?

Read More

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Body Type

Is there a relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and body mass index (BMI)? A 1994 study focused on 949 patients who presented with right arm numbness and tingling. In the study, the patients underwent electromyography and nerve conduction velocity (EMG/NCV)—the “gold standard” of tests to diagnose nerve injuries in conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Read More

Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Is your knee in pain? Exercise may help (+ more daily health updates!)

Manage Knee Pain with Exercise

People who have knee pain are often tempted to rest instead of exercise; however, regular exercise can help strengthen the knees and ease pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends: start exercising slowly and increase repetitions or weights as you get stronger; some discomfort is normal, pain isn’t, so stop if you feel pain; don’t push yourself so hard that you’re in pain the next day; and consult with a therapist or doctor about how often to exercise and the types of exercise you should perform. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, July 2017

Read More

Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Making Health Food More Flavorful

Making Health Food More Flavorful

Going on a diet does not mean eating only bland and boring foods. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends adding flavor the following ways: pan-sear, grill, or broil to intensify flavors; drizzle vegetables with olive oil, then roast in an oven at 450 degrees Fahrenheit (232.2 degrees Celsius); caramelize onions over low heat in a pan with a little oil to give a sweet flavor; add colorful peppers or some hot sauce; add citrus fruit, chipotle peppers, cilantro, or pomegranate seeds to give richer flavor; and use flavorful condiments, such as horseradish, mustard, chutney, or salsa. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, May 2017

Read More

Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Keeping Indoor Air Clean

Sneeze

Keeping Indoor Air Clean

The air in your home can contain allergens that can lead to sneezing, coughing, and itchy eyes among allergy sufferers. To clean the air inside your house, the Mayo Clinic suggests the following: close the windows and run the air conditioning on days when there’s a lot of pollen outside; use a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on your forced air heating and cooling systems (and remember to change it regularly); run a dehumidifier; and vacuum your floors frequently. Mayo Clinic, April 2017

Read More