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NJ Neuropathy

Is Surgery Necessary for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy—that is, it’s the most common place to trap a nerve in the extremities (arms or legs). CTS affects 6-11% of adults in the general population, and it occurs in women more often than men. The cause is often difficult to determine but the most common reasons can include trauma, repetitive maneuvers, certain diseases, pregnancy, being over the age of 50, and obesity.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It SO Common?

According to the literature, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is one of the most prevalent upper extremity complaints. In fact, it IS the most common “compression neuropathy” (of which there are many) and affects 3-6% of adults in the general population. Additionally, CTS can affect BOTH hands in up to 50% of patients with the condition!

The CAUSE of CTS is often unknown and typically comes on gradually, making it difficult to determine a definite cause or specific “date of onset” for CTS.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Let’s Get the FACTS! (Part 3)

This month, we will conclude our three-part series on important facts regarding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

CTS TREATMENT OPTIONS (continued): Aside from the carpal tunnel, there are several places where the median nerve can become compressed as it travels from the neck, down through the shoulder, through tight muscular areas of the upper arm and forearm, and finally through the carpal tunnel at the wrist. In order to achieve good, long-lasting results, treatment must focus on relieving compression at any point along the course of the nerve. This is why chiropractic works SO WELL as it addresses ALL of these areas using manual adjustments, muscle release techniques, and even physical therapy modalities.

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The “Many Faces” of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) can present with a very mild, occasional numbness or tingling in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers and may never progress much beyond that point. But, for other patients, CTS is a painful, rapidly progressive problem that requires immediate attention. What makes it mild for some and bad for others? Let’s take a look!

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