Oakland Spine News

Weekly Health Update: Neck Pain Relief

Chiropractic: Neck Pain Relief.
Three groups received either spinal manipulative therapy from a chiropractor, pain medication (over-the-counter pain relievers, narcotics and muscle relaxants), or exercise recommendations. After 12 weeks, 57% of those who met with a chiropractor and 48% who exercised reported at least a 75% reduction in pain, compared to 33% of the people in the medication group.
Annals of Internal Medicine, January 2012

Mental Attitude: Brain Health.
A recent study recommends that doctors treating patients for type 2 diabetes also take cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors into consideration. The combination of type 2 diabetes and CVD can put patients at a higher risk for long-term cognitive dysfunction, even with CVD at subclinical levels.
Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, June 2013

Health Alert: Summer Heat!
Extreme heat causes 658 deaths a year in the United States. That’s more than tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and lightning combined. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges Americans to take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and to keep informed. When the weather gets extremely hot, body temperatures can rise, causing brain damage, organ damage, and even death. When the human body cannot compensate and cool itself properly, it is more susceptible to heat-related illness. 69% of deaths from heat exposure occur at home, and in 91% of these homes there is no air-conditioning. Most of the victims live alone or are unmarried and 72% of them are male.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2013

Diet: Cholesterol-Lowering Diet.
People who ate a Nordic diet had lower levels of harmful LDL cholesterol, higher levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, fewer fat particles in the blood, and therefore, had a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. The healthy ‘Nordic diet’ contains berries, root vegetables, legumes, cabbage, nuts, game, poultry, fish, whole grains, rapeseed oil, and low-fat dairy products.
Lund University, June 2013

Exercise: 12 Minutes?
Only 20% of American adults get enough exercise. Just 12 minutes of exercise each week is enough to stay fit! Four minute bursts of vigorous physical activity three times each week can elevate oxygen intake levels, lower blood pressure, and decrease glucose levels.
PLOS One, June 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Lifestyle Changes.
The four lifestyle factors that lead to a healthy heart are regular exercise, eating a Mediterranean-style diet, maintaining a normal weight, and not smoking. Adopting these four lifestyle behaviors protected against coronary heart disease as well as the early buildup of calcium deposits in heart arteries, and reduced the chance of death from all causes by 80 percent over an eight-year period.
American Journal of Epidemiology, June 2013

Weekly Health Update: No Headaches!

Chiropractic: No Headaches!
Cervical spine manipulation was associated with significant improvement in reducing headache symptoms involving patients with neck pain and/or neck dysfunction and headache.
Duke Evidence Report, 2001

Mental Attitude: The First Three Years and Aggression.
Children who witnessed domestic violence before age three were more likely to show aggression when they reached grade school, even if they were removed from their home and witnessed no domestic violence in the interim. According to Dr. Megan Holmes, the study’s lead author, “[This] gives social workers a window of opportunity between ages 3 and 5 to help the children socialize and learn what is appropriate behavior.”
Psychology and Psychiatry, March 2013

Health Alert: Alarming Cancer Rates!
By 2020, nearly 47% of people will get cancer in their lifetime, but almost 38% will survive the disease. One reason more people are getting cancer is because we are living longer and the incident rate of cancer increases with an aging population. The reduction in the number of people dying of cancer is because more cases are diagnosed earlier and treatments and care are improving.
Macmillan Cancer Support, June 2013

Diet: TV Exposure?
More time in front of the TV set and higher exposure to TV ads leads to increased consumption of sweetened beverages among children. Each additional hour in front of the TV increased the likelihood of regular sweetened beverage consumption by 50%. Only one parent in seven indicated that they tried to reduce their children’s exposure to TV ads. The same parents stated that their children were less prone to drink soft drinks and other sweetened beverages. Children of parents who were less strict about TV ads were twice as likely to consume sweetened beverages every week.
University of Gothenburg, Sweden, June 2013

Exercise: Soccer and Diabetes.
After three months of soccer training, the hearts of diabetic men appeared to be 10 years “younger”. On average, soccer training reduced the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg. Maximal oxygen uptake was increased by 12% and that their intermittent exercise capacity was elevated by 42%.
University of Copenhagen, June 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Not So Smart.
Smartphones and tablets can disturb sleep. The cause is due to the bright light-emitting diodes that can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that controls the natural sleep-wake cycle. Dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches (~.36m) from your face while using it will reduce these negative effects.
Mayo Clinic, June 2013

Weekly Health Update: Patient Satisfaction

Chiropractic: Patient Satisfaction.
Patients were more satisfied after four weeks of chiropractic care than patients receiving standard medical care. Chiropractic patients were more satisfied after six weeks of care than physical therapy patients.
American Journal of Public Health, 2002

Mental Attitude: Ease Anxiety.
Volunteers with normal levels of anxiety and no previous meditation experience or anxiety disorders participated in four 20-minute classes to learn “mindfulness” meditation. In this form of meditation, people were taught to focus on breath and body sensations and to non-judgmentally evaluate distracting thoughts and emotions. Anxiety ratings fell as much as 39%.
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, June 2013

Health Alert: Dementia Rates Double In China!
In 1990, 3.68 million people in China had dementia. By 2010, that number rose to 9.2 million. Dementia patient health care costs will soon be higher than heart disease and cancer combined. Experts believe the increase can be explained by a combination of factors in China such as increased life expectancy and massive demographic, social, economic and lifestyle transitions that have taken place over the previous two decades.
The Lancet, June 2013

Diet: Benefit From Probiotics.
Patients who are on antibiotics showed a decrease in antibiotic associated symptoms after taking probiotics. This study looked at the effectiveness of probiotics (live bacteria that can take up residence in digestive tracts) in treating common side effects of antibiotics such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea and life-threatening side effects such as Clostridium difficile infection. These two conditions are associated with high morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Antibiotics are non-specific in how they target both our good and bad bacteria. Good bacteria can be killed off that protect us from pathogens like Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the body.
St. Michael’s Hospital, June 2013

Exercise: Pedometer Program.
Using a pedometer to monitor how much people move during the day was effective at increasing activity and decreasing sitting time. In a 12-week program where participants wore a pedometer daily and received emails twice a week offering nutritional and exercise tips, the average weight loss was 2.5 pounds (~ 1.1kg).
American College of Sports Medicine, June 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Check Your Stove!
There is a strong correlation between air pollution from unsafe household stoves and infections, cardiovascular disease, maternal, neonatal health, child health, respiratory disease, burns, and ocular disorders.
PLOS Medicine, June 2013

Weekly Health Update: Treatment for Tension Headaches

Chiropractic: No Headaches!
Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is an effective treatment for tension headaches. In a study, patients who received SMT continued to benefit from care even four weeks after treatment concluded. This is in contrast to patients who received pharmaceutical therapy; they reverted to baseline values when checked a month after treatment ended.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 1995

Mental Attitude: Depression and Stroke Risk in Middle-Aged Women.
A 12-year study of over 10,000 middle-aged Australian women found that those who suffered from depression had nearly double the risk of stroke compared to non-depressed women in their same age group. The American Heart Association encourages everyone to learn how to recognize a stroke. Think F.A.S.T: F-Face Drooping. A-Arm Weakness. S-Speech Difficulty. T-Time To Call 9-1-1 (or the appropriate emergency services number if you’re outside the United States).
American Heart Association, May 2013

Health Alert: Childhood Disability On The Rise!
In the United States, disabilities due to neurodevelopmental and mental health problems increased 16.3% during the first decade of the current century. Six million kids had a disability in 2009-2010, that’s almost 1 million more than in 2001-2002.
Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Diet: Brain Rewards.
Restricting food intake increases the reward value of food, particularly high-calorie and appetizing food. The more successful people are at caloric-restriction dieting, the greater difficulty they will face in maintaining the restriction. Dieting by skipping meals and fasting is less successful than weight loss efforts characterized by intake of low energy, dense, healthy foods. If people want to lose excess weight, it would be more effective to consume healthy, low-fat/low-sugar foods during regular meals, rather than go for long periods of time without eating.
NeuroImage, May 2013

Exercise: It’s Not Too Late To Cut Heart Failure Risk!
In an eight year study, middle-aged participants drastically reduced their risk of heart failure up to 40% by increasing their cardiovascular fitness level.
American Heart Association, May 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Fish Oil, Your Heart, and Stress.
A new study finds that regular consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids (most commonly found in cold water fish like Salmon) improves cardiovascular health by dulling the connection between mentally stressful events and cardiovascular functions like heart rate, blood pressure, the fight-or-flight response, and blood flow. Those who frequently find themselves in stressful situations may benefit from adding Omega-3s to their diet.
American Physiological Society, May 2013

Weekly Health Update: Chiropractic Care Recommended For Low Back Pain

Chiropractic: Recommended For Low Back Pain.
According to a study based in the United Kingdom, chiropractic patients with low back pain improved markedly during the first three months of care with high patient satisfaction scores. Considering all costs of care, the study’s author suggests that chiropractic care be considered “in the wider context of health care delivery in the United Kingdom” for all patients with low back pain.
University of Portsmouth, May 2013

Mental Attitude: Stress and Problem Solving.
People under high levels of chronic stress appear to have impaired problem-solving skills. In a study setting, they solved 50% fewer problems than their non-stressed peers.
PLOS ONE, May 2013

Health Alert: Texting While Driving.
Teens in the United States receive hundreds of text messages a day, but one message they aren’t getting is that they shouldn’t text and drive. 43% of high school students of driving age reported texting while driving at least once in the past 30 days. The specific act of texting while driving has been found to increase the risk of a crash by 23 times, leading many to conclude that texting while driving is more dangerous than driving while intoxicated.
Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Diet: Low Vitamin D Levels and Cardiovascular Problems.
Increased levels of vitamin D in the body result in lower levels of CRP (c-reactive protein) in the blood. High levels of CRP are associated with the hardening of blood vessels and a greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems.
American Journal of Medicine, May 2013

Exercise: Fibromyalgia and Exercise.
For many people who have fibromyalgia, the thought of exercising is painful. However, a recent study shows that light to moderate exercise (light jogging or brisk walking for 20 minutes a day) over a prolonged period of time improves overall symptoms, such as fatigue and trouble sleeping, without increasing pain.
Arthritis Care & Research, May 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Helmet Laws.
900 Americans die each year in bicycle crashes, with three-quarters of the fatalities from head injuries. Bicycle helmets save lives but only 21 US states have laws requiring bicyclists to wear helmets. States with mandatory helmet laws have lower rates of fatalities/incapacitating injuries after bicycle-motor vehicle collisions than states without helmet laws.
Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Weekly Health Update: I Like Those Odds!

Chiropractic: I Like Those Odds!
Patients who went to a chiropractor first had were less likely to undergo surgery than those who went to a surgeon first. 42.7% of workers with back injuries who first saw a surgeon had surgery, in contrast to only 1.5% of those who initially saw a chiropractor.
Spine, December 2012

Mental Attitude: Depression and Dementia.
Those with late-life depression are 1.85 times more likely to develop all-cause dementia, 1.65 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, and 2.52 times more likely to develop vascular dementia. The phrase “all-cause dementia” refers to all dementia syndromes, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60-80% of all dementia cases. Alzheimer’s is associated with memory problems and apathy in early stages, and impaired judgment, confusion, disorientation, behavior changes, and difficulty speaking in later stages. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia, and is associated with impaired judgment or ability to plan and complete tasks, as opposed to memory loss that is common in early stages of Alzheimer’s.
British Journal of Psychiatry, May 2013

Health Alert: What Concussion?
Many United States high school football players think it’s okay to play with a concussion even though they know they are at risk of serious injury. Over 90% of players polled recognized a risk of serious injury if they returned to play too quickly, but only 54% would always or sometimes report their concussion symptoms to their coach.
Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Diet: Fight Inflammation!
Chronic inflammation is a condition that can be triggered by obesity and can ultimately lead to both cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Some foods that are known to combat unhealthy inflammation are citrus fruits, leafy greens, tomatoes, wild salmon, and whole foods high in fiber.
University of Alabama at Birmingham, March 2013

Exercise: ‘Walkable’ Neighborhoods.
Preschool children are less likely to be obese if they live in a neighborhood that is safe and within walking distance of parks and retail services.
Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Brain Power Boost.
Regularly consuming the healthy fats found in fish, extra virgin olive oil, and nuts may assist in maintaining cognitive functions in older individuals.
British Medical Journal, May 2013

Weekly Health Update: Chiropractic Care and Asthma

Chiropractic: Asthma?
A review of published literature shows that patients with asthma who incorporate chiropractic care into their current asthma treatment plan may experience a decrease in the severity of their symptoms.
Logan College of Chiropractic, December 2012

Mental Attitude: Suicide Rates Rise!
Suicide rates among middle-aged (35-65) Americans have risen 28% in the past 10 years with the largest increase among people in their 50s at nearly 50%. Suicide deaths have become more common than deaths from car crashes. In 2010, there were 33,687 deaths from car crashes and 38,364 suicides in the United States. Suicide prevention strategies include improving social support and community connectedness, increasing access to mental health and preventive services, and decreasing the stigma and barriers linked to asking for help.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, May 2013

Health Alert: Heart and Brain Function.
People with the greatest risk for heart disease performed 50% worse on cognitive tests when compared to people with the lowest risk profile. Diabetes, bad cholesterol, and smoking were all negatively linked to poor cognitive scores.
Stroke, May 2013

Diet: Just One Meal.
A single fatty meal can cause the heart to beat harder and increase blood pressure. Researchers analyzed the effects of eating a high-fat fast food meal (42 grams of fat) and eating a meal with no more than 1.3 grams of fat. When subjected to a series of standard stress tests, those who ate the high-fat meal saw their blood pressure go up 1.25 to 1.5 times higher than the those who ate the low-fat meal.
Journal of Nutrition, April 2007

Exercise: Only 1 in 5 Adults…
Only 20% of American adults perform the recommended amount of exercise as outlined in federal guidelines. Adults should get at least two and a half hours each week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (like walking), or one hour and 15 minutes each week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (like jogging), or a mixture of both. Adults should also engage in muscle strengthening activities, including sit-ups, push-ups, or exercise using resistance bands or weights. All major muscle groups should be involved in these activities and should be done at least two days every week.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2013

Wellness/Prevention: Celery and Cancer Cells Mortality.
One way cancer cells thrive is by simply not dying as other cells are pre-programmed to do. Apigenin, a compound found in plant based foods like parsley and celery, has been observed in a laboratory setting to re-educate breast cancer cells to die as scheduled.
Ohio State University, May 2013

Weekly Health Update: Satisfied Low Back Pain Patients

Chiropractic: Satisfied Low Back Pain Patients.
Patients with chronic low-back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction after one month of care than patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients. A higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56% vs. 13%) reported that their low-back pain was better or much better, whereas nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low-back pain was worse or much worse.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2000

Mental Attitude: Happily Married?
A recent study concludes that young and happily married newlyweds are more likely to gain weight than their young and unhappily married counterparts. For each unit increase in satisfaction, on average, males and females both gained one tenth of a BMI unit every 6 months – or about one pound a year. According to Dr. Andrea Meltzer, lead author of the study, “These findings challenge the idea that quality relationships always benefit health, suggesting instead that spouses in satisfying relationships relax their efforts to maintain their weight because they are no longer motivated to attract a mate. Interventions to prevent weight gain in early marriage may therefore benefit from encouraging spouses to think about their weight in terms of health rather than appearance.”
Health Psychology, April 2013

Health Alert: Less Salt, More Potassium.
Reducing salt intake can lower blood pressure, which ultimately reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke. Results show that four or more weeks of modest salt reduction leads to notable decreases in blood pressure. Increased potassium intake was associated with a 24% reduced probability of stroke in adults and may also have an advantageous impact on blood pressure in kids.
British Medical Journal, April 2013

Diet: So How Much Salt and Potassium Should You Consume?
The World Health Organization recommends adults should reduce salt intake to 5g per day and consume at least 3510mg of potassium per day.
World Health Organization, January 2013

Exercise: More Reasons.
Exercise helps to retard bone loss as you age, thereby reducing your risk of developing osteoporosis. Exercise also helps improves pain tolerance and mood if you already suffer from osteoarthritis.
Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, 1996

Wellness/Prevention: Sleep Well.
Increasing the number of hours adolescents sleep each night may reduce the prevalence of adolescent obesity. A recent study shows that fewer hours of sleep is associated with greater increases in adolescent body mass index (BMI) for participants between 14 and 18 years old. Increasing sleep from 8 to 10 hours per day at age 18 could result in a 4% reduction in the number of adolescents with a BMI above 25. This would translate to 500,000 fewer overweight adolescents.
Pediatrics, April 2013