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Oakland Spine News

Weekly Health Update — Could Migraines and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Be Linked?

Chiropractic: Could Migraines and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Be Linked?
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome can increase an individual’s risk for migraine headaches, and migraines may increase the likelihood of one developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 26,000 Americans and found that the risk of migraine was 2.6 times higher in people with carpal tunnel syndrome. Similarly, the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was 2.7 times higher among migraine sufferers.
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, March 2015

Mental Attitude: Leafy Greens May Protect Aging Brains.
An evaluation of the eating habits and mental abilities of over 950 older adults revealed that eating a single serving of leafy green vegetables per day may reduce an individual’s risk for dementia. The study found that those who consumed one or two servings of spinach, kale, mustard greens, collards, or similar vegetables on a daily basis experienced slower mental deterioration than those who ate no leafy greens at all. Dr. Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine writes, "It makes sense that leafy green vegetables would have an effect on mental health… We know generally that what you eat, or don’t eat, can affect your risk for high blood pressure and vascular disease, which can both then worsen the course of dementia."
American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting, March 2015

Health Alert: Depression and Diabetes Both Increase Dementia Risk!
Previous research has shown that both type 2 diabetes and depression can independently increase an individual’s risk for dementia, but what happens when they co-occur? Danish researchers analyzed data collected from 2.4 million adults and found that while depression increases a person’s risk for dementia by 83% and the presence of type 2 diabetes results in a 20% greater risk, those with both type 2 diabetes and depression are 117% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia. This suggests that the presence of both conditions has a synergistic effect on dementia risk, not just an additive effect.
JAMA Psychiatry, April 2015

Diet: New Broccoli Reduces Cholesterol.
Eating ten or more weekly servings of a new variety of broccoli has been demonstrated to reduce Low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) levels by about 6%. This new broccoli variety known as Beneforte was bred to contain two to three times more glucoraphanin, a compound that is converted to sulphoraphane inside the body. Previous research has observed that sulphoraphane activates genes that keep the body from converting excess dietary fat and sugar into bad cholesterol.
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, April 2015

Exercise: Exercise Helps Fibromyalgia Patients.
An 18-week functional training program for women with fibromyalgia (FM) resulted in reductions in both pain and tender points along with a positive impact on their overall quality of life. If further studies verify these findings, such training (which consisted of two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise each week) could play an important role in helping FM patients maintain an independent lifestyle.
Modern Rheumatology, April 2015

Wellness/Prevention: What Part of the Day Do Teens Become Less Active?
While adolescents have been observed to be less physically active and spend more time performing sedentary activities as they grow older, no previous studies have analyzed how these changes occur during the course of a teen’s average week. In this study, 363 teens wore accelerometers at both age 12 and age 15, and researchers recorded how much time was spent each day being inactive or performing either light physical activity or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. They found that by age 15, participants were sedentary 7-8% more often during school hours and both after school and on weekends. Across the board, students spent about 7% less time performing light physical activities while moderate-to-vigorous activity levels remained largely unchanged. Due to the increase in sedentary time across all aspects of an adolescent’s week, the investigators recommend that future interventions intended to help teens become more active need to focus on both their in-school and after-school/weekend activities.
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015

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